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Certain buildings, individuals, and objects simply feel out of place. It’s obvious when your bookshelf would look better on the other side of the living room or when an uncomfortable person can’t manage to jump into a group conversation.

Displacement doesn’t have to be such a serious matter, however.

This morning, I noticed an unusually placed Victoria’s Secret shop on Connecticut Avenue. A block from the Farragut North metro station, the store is easily accessible, yet it lacks the feel of most Victoria’s Secret venues.

Perhaps the construction work sparked my reaction of disorientation and confusion, but the store itself just doesn’t emit the vibe that Victoria’s Secrets all over attempt to achieve. For starters, there’s no sign for Victoria’s Secret’s Pink clothing line, which, in recent years, has significantly altered the VS franchise. Victoria’s Secret was open, yet the doors were shut, making it nearly impossible for outsiders to hear the store’s upbeat music that typically attracts customers.

It also just doesn’t seem fitting to plant a Victoria’s Secret shop smack dab in the heart of D.C. Across the street from this venue were a CVS, bank, Daily Market, and metro stop. Hence, it wasn’t as if the Victoria’s Secret was situated among a bunch of clothing stores (with the exception of Men’s Wearhouse, which further proves my argument that this VS deserves more appropriate placement). It’s merely a neglected, abridged Victoria’s Secret in the middle of a business-heavy part of town.

Don’t get met wrong. I adore VS, and this is why I hate this particular displacement. To be fair, I’m actually relieved to know that I don’t need to travel to a mall in order to make purchases from this amazing vendor.

Still, it saddens me to see a Victoria’s Secret look so out of place and incomplete. If it can’t be in a shopping center or mall setting, it should at least be surrounded by similar stores, not hiding behind orange cones, pieces of wood, and cemented walls.

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